The Housing Market’s 50 Hottest Zip Codes

The Housing Market’s 50 Hottest Zip Codes
realtor.com | October 1, 2018

The following is realtor.com®’s rankings of the top 50 hottest ZIP codes for housing in the country.

1810-realtor.com-chart_hot-ZIPs

Source: National Association of REALTORS®

50 Markets Ranked: Where Does Yours Fall?

50 Markets Ranked: Where Does Yours Fall?
Article by Daily Real Estate News | October 25, 2016

NashvilleSkyBridge130x210
Nashville, TN

Who has the hottest single-family housing market this fall? Fort Lauderdale, Fla., according to a new report released by Ten-X, an online real estate marketplace. Ten-X ranked the 50 largest single-family housing markets for fall 2016 based on current and forecasted fundamentals.

Florida markets continue to dominate its list for the second consecutive season.

“Florida’s housing market continues to set the pace for the nation, with five of the top 10 metros on our report,” says Rick Sharga, Ten-X executive vice president. “While all of the top five markets took substantial hits during the housing crash, especially Las Vegas, the continued road to recovery for these destination cities is looking even brighter.”

The five single-family markets topping Ten-X’s list for this fall are: Fort Lauderdale, Fla.; Palm Beach County, Fla.; Tampa, Fla.; Orlando; and Las Vegas.

The rankings factor in pricing, sales, permit activity, and economic growth, population growth.

See how your metro stacked up.

  1. Fort Lauderdale
  2. Palm Beach County
  3. Tampa
  4. Orlando
  5. Las Vegas
  6. Phoenix
  7. Seattle
  8. Nashville
  9. Dallas
  10. Jacksonville
  11. Denver
  12. Portland
  13. Oakland
  14. Atlanta
  15. Columbus
  16. Raleigh
  17. San Francisco
  18. San Jose
  19. Miami
  20. Boston
  21. Austin
  22. San Diego
  23. Charlotte
  24. Salt Lake City
  25. DC
  26. Riverside
  27. Los Angeles
  28. Indianapolis
  29. Sacramento
  30. Minneapolis
  31. Fort Worth
  32. Orange County
  33. San Antonio
  34. Kansas City
  35. Detroit
  36. Pittsburgh
  37. Cincinnati
  38. Milwaukee
  39. Northern Virginia
  40. St. Louis
  41. Suburban Maryland
  42. Houston
  43. Memphis
  44. Philadelphia
  45. Long Island
  46. Northern New Jersey
  47. Chicago
  48. Cleveland
  49. Central New Jersey
  50. Baltimore

Source: Ten-X   Article distribution: REALTOR® Magazine Online, Daily Real Estate News 102516

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Top 10 Places for New Grads to Live and Work

Apartments.com and CareerRookie.com, CareerBuilder’s college job search site, have identified the 10 best cities for recent college graduates to both find a job and an affordable apartment. 

The list was compiled by identifying the top U.S. cities with the highest concentration of young adults, the largest inventory of jobs requiring less than one year of experience, and the most apartments affordable on a median new graduate’s salary. 

Here’s the list of selected cities and the cost of renting a one-bedroom apartment. 

1. Atlanta, $723
2. Phoenix, $669
3. Denver, $779
4. Dallas, $740
5. Boston, $1,275
6. Philadelphia, $938
7. New York, $1,366
8. Cincinnati, $613
9. Baltimore, $1,041
10. Los Angeles, $1,319

Source: CareerRookie.com and Apartments.com (05/05/2010)

Fed Beige Book: Real Estate Mostly on Upswing

Most districts reported improving economies and better residential real estate markets in the third of eight annual editions of the Federal Reserve’s Beige Book – this one published in April. 

Every district but St. Louis and San Francisco reported that residential sales were up, but in Philadelphia, Cleveland, and Kansas City, there were concerns that the impending expiration of the first-time home buyer tax credit would slow sales. 

Home prices continued to decrease in the New York and Atlanta districts, with sales particularly sluggish for high-end homes in New York, Kansas City, Dallas, and San Francisco. New residential construction increased in New York, Atlanta, St. Louis, Minneapolis, and Dallas, but was weak in Cleveland, Chicago, and San Francisco. 

Source: HousingWire.com, Austin Kilgore (04/14/2010)