U.S. News Reveals Best Places to Live List

U.S. News Reveals Best Places to Live List
U.S. News & World Report
article by Daily Real Estate News | April 11, 2018

Austin, Texas, ranked number one for the second year in a row as the top place to live in the United States, according to new rankings released by U.S. News & World Report. The magazine ranks the 125 largest metros based on affordability, employment prospects, and quality of life each year.

“When deciding on a place to settle down, it’s important to understand that where a person lives can impact their well-being,” says Kim Castro, executive editor at U.S. News. “The top-ranked places are areas where citizens can feel the most fulfilled socially, physically, and financially.”

The top 12 best places to live in 2018 are:

  1. Austin, Texas
  2. Colorado Springs, Colorado
  3. Denver, Colorado
  4. Des Moines, Iowa
  5. Fayetteville, Arkansas
  6. Portland, Oregon
  7. Huntsville, Alabama
  8. Washington, D.C.
  9. Minneapolis, Minnesota
  10. Seattle, Washington
  11. Nashville, Tennessee
  12. Grand Rapids, Michigan

Source: U.S. News & World Report; REALTOR® Magazine Online, Daily Real Estate News 041118

Markets with the Most Rapid Home Sales

Markets with the Most Rapid Home Sales
realtor.com   article by Daily Real Estate News | March 13, 2018

House 1034In some markets, homes are selling at record speeds. Realtor.com®’s research team scoured the listing data to find which markets are seeing the quickest sales, based on the median number of days on the market.

The number of days spent on the market is important for sellers and prospective buyers to know, says realtor.com®’s chief economist Danielle Hale.

“That info can give home buyers an idea of how much competition they face, how limited homes are in the market, and how quickly they need to make a decision if they find a home they like,” says Hale. For sellers, it can give them an idea of how long they may have to move elsewhere.

The median number of days on the market nationwide is dropping due to an imbalance in many places in the low supply of homes compared to high demand from buyers.

Out of the nation’s 300 largest metros, realtor.com®’s research team found that the following places saw the lowest number of days on the market for its homes for sale: (Note: realtor.com® limited its ranking to one metro per state for geographic diversity.)

  1. San Jose, CA.: 28.6 (median days on the market)
  2. Seattle, WA: 34.1
  3. Salt Lake City, UT: 38.2
  4. Denver, CO: 39.2
  5. Nashville, TN: 40.6
  6. Portland, OR: 44.3
  7. Boise, ID: 46
  8. Sioux Falls, SD: 46.8
  9. Omaha, NE: 47.2
  10. Minneapolis, MN: 47.3

Visit realtor.com® to find out where homes are lingering on the market the longest.

Source: “Where Homes Are Flying Off the Market—and Where They’re Lingering Longest,” realtor.com® (March 12, 2018); REALTOR® Magazine Online, Daily Real Estate News 031318

50 Markets Ranked: Where Does Yours Fall?

50 Markets Ranked: Where Does Yours Fall?
Article by Daily Real Estate News | October 25, 2016

NashvilleSkyBridge130x210
Nashville, TN

Who has the hottest single-family housing market this fall? Fort Lauderdale, Fla., according to a new report released by Ten-X, an online real estate marketplace. Ten-X ranked the 50 largest single-family housing markets for fall 2016 based on current and forecasted fundamentals.

Florida markets continue to dominate its list for the second consecutive season.

“Florida’s housing market continues to set the pace for the nation, with five of the top 10 metros on our report,” says Rick Sharga, Ten-X executive vice president. “While all of the top five markets took substantial hits during the housing crash, especially Las Vegas, the continued road to recovery for these destination cities is looking even brighter.”

The five single-family markets topping Ten-X’s list for this fall are: Fort Lauderdale, Fla.; Palm Beach County, Fla.; Tampa, Fla.; Orlando; and Las Vegas.

The rankings factor in pricing, sales, permit activity, and economic growth, population growth.

See how your metro stacked up.

  1. Fort Lauderdale
  2. Palm Beach County
  3. Tampa
  4. Orlando
  5. Las Vegas
  6. Phoenix
  7. Seattle
  8. Nashville
  9. Dallas
  10. Jacksonville
  11. Denver
  12. Portland
  13. Oakland
  14. Atlanta
  15. Columbus
  16. Raleigh
  17. San Francisco
  18. San Jose
  19. Miami
  20. Boston
  21. Austin
  22. San Diego
  23. Charlotte
  24. Salt Lake City
  25. DC
  26. Riverside
  27. Los Angeles
  28. Indianapolis
  29. Sacramento
  30. Minneapolis
  31. Fort Worth
  32. Orange County
  33. San Antonio
  34. Kansas City
  35. Detroit
  36. Pittsburgh
  37. Cincinnati
  38. Milwaukee
  39. Northern Virginia
  40. St. Louis
  41. Suburban Maryland
  42. Houston
  43. Memphis
  44. Philadelphia
  45. Long Island
  46. Northern New Jersey
  47. Chicago
  48. Cleveland
  49. Central New Jersey
  50. Baltimore

Source: Ten-X   Article distribution: REALTOR® Magazine Online, Daily Real Estate News 102516

KENNETH BARGERS REALTOR® License 318311 | Pilkerton Realtors License 257352
(615) 512-9836 cellular • (615) 915-5901 facsimilekb@bargers-solutions.com email
bargers-solutions.com webkennethbargers.com blogSearch Properties
(615) 371-2474 office • (615) 371-2475 facsimile • 2 Cadillac Drive, Brentwood TN 37027 address

Nashville among the 10 Hot Housing Markets for Singles

10 Hot Housing Markets for Singles
Article by Daily Real Estate News | February 12, 2016

In some cities, love and real estate could make a perfect match. Realtor.com®’s research team recently identified the cities that attract singles with low employment, affordable housing, and a wide range of fun activities.

“These markets are not simply places with a high number of singles; in fact, the raw share of singles in these markets combined is about the same as the U.S. average,” says Javier Vivas, a realtor.com economic research analyst. “What really distinguishes this set are the more favorable conditions singles face when it comes to home ownership. Some of those right ingredients include solid job creation, rational price appreciation, and varied amounts of affordable inventory.”

The following cities boast 20 to 50 percent more single-owned households compared to the rest of the nation. Also, median list prices are more affordable for residents earning the median income, and unemployment rates are near or less than the national average of 5 percent.

Realtor.com® identified the following cities as the “best cities for singles looking for love and real estate.”

Hottest-Cities-for-Singles-

Visit realtor.com® to learn more about these top 10 single cities and the best date ideas in each of the top 10 locales too.

Source: “Best Cities for Singles Looking for Love and Real Estate,” realtor.com® (Feb. 10, 2016); REALTOR® Magazine Online, Daily Real Estate News 021216

Kenneth Bargers, REALTOR® | Pilkerton Realtors
(615) 512-9836 cellular (615) 371-2474 office kb@bargers-solutions.com email
www.bargers-solutions.com web kennethbargers.com blog
2 Cadillac Drive, Brentwood Tennessee address

Need a home? visit Search for Properties
Do you need marketing assistance for special projects or contract assignments? visit the Marketing page of Bargers Solutions

10 Best Cities for Working Women with Kids

ForbesWoman calculated the best cities for working females raising children. To pick the 10 best, it factored in crime rates, quality of the schools, availability of good healthcare, employment opportunities with high earning potential, and a budget-friendly cost of living. 

Here are their picks

  1. Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn.
  2. Washington, D.C.
  3. Boston, Mass.
  4. Pittsburgh, Pa.
  5. Baltimore-Towson, Md.
  6. Denver, Colo.
  7. Hartford, Conn.
  8. New York, New York
  9. Seattle-Tacoma, Wash.
  10. Buffalo-Niagara Falls, N.Y.

Source: ForbesWoman, Meghan Casserly (07/26/2010)

Fed Beige Book: Real Estate Mostly on Upswing

Most districts reported improving economies and better residential real estate markets in the third of eight annual editions of the Federal Reserve’s Beige Book – this one published in April. 

Every district but St. Louis and San Francisco reported that residential sales were up, but in Philadelphia, Cleveland, and Kansas City, there were concerns that the impending expiration of the first-time home buyer tax credit would slow sales. 

Home prices continued to decrease in the New York and Atlanta districts, with sales particularly sluggish for high-end homes in New York, Kansas City, Dallas, and San Francisco. New residential construction increased in New York, Atlanta, St. Louis, Minneapolis, and Dallas, but was weak in Cleveland, Chicago, and San Francisco. 

Source: HousingWire.com, Austin Kilgore (04/14/2010)