Nationally: Existing-Home Sales Reach Slowest Pace in 2 Years

Existing-Home Sales Reach Slowest Pace in 2 Years
National Association of REALTORS® | August 22, 2018

Existing-home sales slowed for the fourth consecutive month in July, reaching their most sluggish pace in more than two years, the National Association of REALTORS® reports. The West was the only major U.S. region to see an increase in sales last month.

1808_NAR-July-EHSTotal existing-home sales, which include completed transactions for single-family homes, townhomes, condos, and co-ops, fell 0.7 percent month over month to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.34 million in July. Sales are now 1.5 percent lower than a year ago.

Rising home prices may be prompting would-be home buyers to pull away, says NAR Chief Economist Lawrence Yun. “Led by a notable decrease in closings in the Northeast, existing-home sales trailed off again last month, sliding to their slowest pace since February 2016 at 5.21 million [units],” Yun says. “Too many would-be buyers are either being priced out or are deciding to postpone their search until more homes in their price range come onto the market.”

Yun notes that a steady climb in home prices over the past year—along with an uptick in mortgage rates this spring—is cooling sales. “This weakening in affordability has put the most pressure on would-be first-time buyers in recent months, who continue to represent only around a third of sales despite a very healthy economy and labor market,” he says. First-time buyers comprised 32 percent of sales in July, down from 33 percent a year ago.

Here’s a closer look at some key indicators from NAR’s July housing report:

  • Home prices: The median existing-home price for all housing types was $296,600, a 4.5 percent increase from a year ago.
  • Inventories: Total housing inventory fell 0.5 percent to 1.92 million existing homes available for sale, unchanged from a year ago. At the current sales pace, unsold inventory is at a 4.3-month supply.
  • Days on the market: Fifty-five percent of homes sold were on the market for less than a month. Properties typically stayed on the market for 27 days, down from 30 days a year ago. “Listings continue to go under contract in under a month, which highlights the feedback from REALTORS® that buyers are swiftly snatching up moderately-priced properties,” Yun says. “Existing supply is still not at a healthy level, and new-home construction is not keeping up to meet demand.”
  • All-cash sales: All-cash transactions compromised 20 percent of sales, up from 19 percent a year ago. Individual investors tend to account for the biggest bulk of cash sales. They purchased 13 percent of homes, unchanged from a year ago.
  • Distressed sales: Foreclosures and short sales accounted for 3 percent of sales, down from 5 percent a year ago. Broken out, 2 percent of sales were foreclosures, and 1 percent were short sales.

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Source: National Association of REALTORS®; REALTOR® Magazine Online 082218

Nationally: Sky-High Home Prices Shatter Ceiling Again

Nationally: Sky-High Home Prices Shatter Ceiling Again
National Association of REALTORS® | July 23, 2018

Ongoing inventory shortages helped to push the median sale price for existing homes to another all-time high in June, the National Association of REALTORS® reports. The median price for all housing types was $276,900, surpassing a previous record set in May. Home prices have surged 5.2 percent since a year ago.

June2018NARsnapshotThe mix of low inventory and high home prices may have had influence on existing-home sales in June, which fell for the third consecutive month. Total existing-home sales, which include completed transactions for single-family homes, townhomes, condos, and co-ops, declined 0.6 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.38 million. Sales are now 2.2 percent lower than a year ago, with drops in the South and West offsetting gains in the Northeast and Midwest.

“There continues to be a mismatch since the spring between the growing level of homebuyer demand in most of the country in relation to the actual pace of home sales, which are declining,” says NAR Chief Economist Lawrence Yun. “The root cause is without a doubt the severe housing shortage that is not releasing its grip on the nation’s housing market. What is for sale in most areas is going under contract very fast and, in many cases, has multiple offers. This dynamic is keeping home price growth elevated, pricing out would-be buyers and ultimately slowing sales.”

Here’s a closer look at key indicators from NAR’s June housing report:

  • Inventory: Total housing inventory rose 4.3 percent to 1.95 million existing homes available for sale, which is 0.5 percent higher than a year ago. That marks the first year-over-year increase since June 2015. Unsold inventory is at a 4.3-month supply at the current sales pace.
  • Days on the market: Fifty-eight percent of homes sold in June were on the market less than a month. Properties, on average, stayed on the market for 26 days, down from 28 days a year ago. “It’s important to note that despite the modest year-over-year rise in inventory, the current level is far from what’s needed to satisfy demand levels,” Yun says. “Furthermore, it remains to be seen if this modest increase will stick given the fact that the robust economy is bringing more interested buyers into the market and new-home construction is failing to keep up.”
  • First-time buyers: First-time buyers comprised 31 percent of sales, down from 32 percent a year ago.
  • All-cash sales: All-cash transactions made up 22 percent of transactions, up from 18 percent a year ago. Individual investors account for the biggest bulk of cash sales. Investors comprised 13 percent of home sales in June, unchanged from a year ago.
  • Distressed sales: Foreclosures and short sales made up 3 percent of sales, the lowest since NAR began tracking such data in October 2008. Distressed sales are down 4 percent from a year ago. Broken out, 2 percent of sales were foreclosures, and 1 percent were short sales.

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Source: National Association of REALTORS®; REALTOR® Magazine 072318

Nationally: Home Prices Hit a Record High

Nationally: Home Prices Hit a Record High
National Association of REALTORS® | June 20, 2018

Home buyers can expect to pay more for a home this summer. The median existing-home price for all housing types reached an all-time high in May at $264,800, according to the latest housing report released by the National Association of REALTORS®.

Many markets continue to see a flood of buyers but not enough homes for sale, which is prompting prices to rise and also limiting the number of sales. For the second consecutive month, existing-home sales dropped, even in the midst of a typically busy selling season.

NAR-EHS-May18smTotal existing-home sales—which are completed transactions for single-family homes, townhomes, condos, and co-ops—fell 0.4 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.43 million in May, the National Association of REALTORS® reported Wednesday. Sales are now 3 percent lower than a year ago.

“Inventory coming onto the market during this year’s spring buying season was not even close to being enough to satisfy demand,” says Lawrence Yun, NAR’s chief economist. “That is why home prices keep outpacing incomes and listings are going under contract in less than a month—and much faster—in many parts of the country.”

Closings were down in a majority of the country last month and declined on an annual basis in every major region, Yun says. “Incredibly low supply continues to be the primary impediment to more sales, but there’s no question the combination of higher prices and mortgage rates are pinching the budgets of prospective buyers, and ultimately keeping some from reaching the market,” Yun says.

May’s Housing Stats

Here’s a closer look at some of the key indicators of the housing market from NAR’s latest housing report:

  • Home prices: The median existing-home price for all housing types was $264,800 in May, an all-time high. Home prices were up 4.9 percent from a year ago.
  • Inventory: Total housing inventory at the end of May rose 2.8 percent to 1.85 million existing homes available for sale. Still, the number of homes for sale is 6.1 percent lower than a year ago. Unsold inventory is at a 4.1-month supply at the current sales pace.
  • Days on the market: Properties typically stayed on the market for 26 days in May, down from 27 days a year ago. Fifty-eight percent of homes sold in May were on the market for less than a month.
    First-time home buyers: This segment comprised 31 percent of sales in May, down from 33 percent a year ago.
  • All-cash sales: All-cash sales accounted for 21 percent of transactions in May, down from 22 percent a year ago. Individual investors tend to make up the bulk of cash sales. They purchased 15 percent of homes in May, down from 16 percent a year ago.
  • Distressed sales: Foreclosures and short sales made up 3 percent of sales in May, the lowest reading since NAR began tracking such data in 2008. Distressed sales are down from 5 percent a year ago. In May, 2 percent of sales were foreclosures and 1 percent were short sales.

Source: National Association of REALTORS®; REALTOR® Mag News, 062018

Nationally: Why Sales Fell Short at Year’s End

Nationally: Why Sales Fell Short at Year’s End
National Association of REALTORS®   article by Daily Real Estate News | January 24, 2018

Existing-home sales in 2017 surged to the best year for sales in 11 years, the National Association of REALTORS® reported Wednesday.

Total existing-home sales—which include completed transactions for single-family homes, townhomes, condos, and co-ops—rose 1.1 percent in 2017 to a 5.51 million sales pace. The sales pace surpassed 2016’s 5.45 million, which had been the highest pace since 2006.

However, the end-of-the-year sales numbers were overcast somewhat by a slower sales pace in December. Existing-home sales decreased 3.6 percent in December month over month to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.57 million.

“Existing sales concluded the year on a softer note, but they were guided higher these last 12 months by a multistreak of exceptional job growth, which ignited buyer demand,” says Lawrence Yun, NAR’s chief economist. “At the same time, market conditions were far from perfect. New listings struggled to keep up with what was sold very quickly, and buying became less affordable in a large swath of the country. These two factors ultimately muted what should have been a stronger sales pace.”

Closings scaled back in most areas of the country in December due to affordability and inventory woes, Yun adds. “Affordability pressures persisted, and the pool of interested buyers at the end of the year significantly outweighed what was available for sale,” Yun says.

Market Snapshot for December

Here are some key highlights from NAR’s latest housing report:

  • Home prices: The median existing-home price for all housing types in December was $246,800, which is 5.8 percent higher than a year ago.
  • First-time buyers: First-time home purchasers comprised 32 percent of sales in December, up from 29 percent in November.
  • Days on the market: Forty-four percent of homes sold in December were on the market for less than a month. Properties typically stayed on the market for 40 days in December, down from 52 days a year ago.
  • All-cash transactions: All-cash sales comprised 20 percent of transactions in December, which is down slightly from 21 percent a year ago. Individual investors, who make up the bulk of cash sales, accounted for 16 percent of the homes sold in December, up from 14 percent a year ago.
  • Distressed sales: Foreclosures and short sales made up 5 percent of sales in December, down from 7 percent a year ago. Broken out, 4 percent of December’s sales were foreclosures and 1 percent were short sales.
  • Inventory: Total housing inventory fell 11.4 percent in December to 1.48 million existing homes available for sale. Inventory is now 10.3 percent lower than a year ago. Unsold inventory is at a 3.2-month supply at the current sales pace, which is the lowest level since NAR began tracking such data in 1999.

“The lack of supply over the past year has been eye-opening and is why, even with strong job creation pushing wages higher, home price gains—at 5.8 percent nationally in 2017—doubled the pace of income growth and were even swifter in several markets,” Yun explains.

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Source: National Association of REALTORS®; REALTOR® Magazine Online, Daily Real Estate News 012418

Nationally: Meager Sales Rebound Underscores Tough Market

Nationally: Meager Sales Rebound Underscores Tough Market
National Association of REALTORS® article by Daily Real Estate News | October 20, 2017

House 1028Following three consecutive months of declines, existing-home sales ticked up in September from the previous month—but ongoing inventory shortages, coupled with recent hurricanes, muted any annual gains, the National Association of REALTORS® reported Friday.

Total existing-home sales, which include single-family homes, townhomes, condos, and co-ops, increased 0.7 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.39 million in September, 1.5 percent below a year ago. September also marks the second slowest month for sales in more than a year, behind August, NAR notes.

September EHS Infographic #1“Home sales in recent months remain at their lowest level of the year and are unable to break through, despite considerable buyer interest in most parts of the country,” says NAR Chief Economist Lawrence Yun. “REALTORS® this fall continue to say the primary impediments stifling sales growth are the same as they have been all year: not enough listings—especially at the lower end of the market—and fast-rising prices that are straining budgets of prospective buyers.”

Sales activity likely would have been stronger if not for Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, which struck Texas and South Florida in late August and early September, Yun says, adding that both areas saw “temporary but notable declines.”

5 Stats to Gauge the Market
Key indicators from NAR’s September existing-home sales report:

Home prices: The median existing-home price for all housing types was $245,100, up 4.2 percent from a year ago. “A continuation of last month’s alleviating price growth, which was the slowest since last December, would improve affordability conditions and be good news for the would-be buyers who have been held back by higher prices this year,” Yun says.

Days on the market: Forty-eight percent of homes sold were on the market for less than a month. Properties typically stayed on the market for 34 days, down from 39 days a year ago.

All-cash sales: These transactions comprised 20 percent of sales, down from 21 percent a year ago. Individual investors accounted for the biggest bulk of cash sales; they purchased 15 percent of homes, which was the same level as a year ago.

Distressed sales: Foreclosures and short sales accounted for 4 percent of sales, unchanged from a year ago. Broken out, 3 percent of sales were foreclosures, and 1 percent were short sales.

Inventory: Housing inventory at the end of the month increased 1.6 percent to 1.9 million existing homes available for sale, but it still remains 6.4 percent lower than a year ago. Unsold inventory is at a 4.2-month supply at the current sales pace, down from 4.5 months a year ago.

Source: National Association of REALTORS®; REALTOR® Magazine Online, Daily Real Estate News 102017


Kenneth Bargers, REALTOR® License 318311 ♦ Pilkerton Realtors License 257352
(615) 512-9836 cellular ♦ (615) 371-2474 office
kb@bargers-solutions.com emailkb@kennethbargers.realtor email
www.bargers-solutions..com webkennethbargers.com blog
2 Cadillac Drive, Brentwood, Tennessee 37027 address

Existing-Home Sales Kick Off Strong Spring

Existing-Home Sales Kick Off Strong Spring
Daily Real Estate News | April 20, 2016

REALTORlogoAfter dismal numbers in February, home sales were back on track in March, ramping up for a strong spring selling season, the National Association of REALTORS® reported Wednesday. In particular, gains in the Northeast and Midwest helped fuel the rebound.

Total sales for existing homes surged 5.1 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.33 million in March — up 1.5 percent from a year ago — according to NAR’s latest existing-home sales data. The report shows that all four major regions of the U.S. posted gains.

“Closings came back in force last month as a greater number of buyers overcame depressed inventory levels and steady price growth to close on a home,” says NAR Chief Economist Lawrence Yun. “Buyer demand remains sturdy in most areas this spring, and the mid-priced market is doing quite well. However, sales are softer both at the very low and very high ends of the market because of supply limitations and affordability pressures.”

5 Stats to Gauge the Market

Here’s an overview of some of the key stats from NAR’s latest housing report:

  1. Home prices: The median price for an existing home in all housing types was $222,700 in March, up 5.7 percent from a year ago.
  2. Days on the market: Forty-two percent of homes sold in March were on the market for less than a month. But the overall average for time on market was 47 days, below the 52-day average a year ago. Short sales tended to linger on the market the longest, at a median of 120 days, while foreclosures typically sold in 50 days and non-distressed homes averaged 46 days.
  3. Distressed sales: Foreclosures and short sales dropped to 8 percent in March, down from 10 percent a year ago. Broken out, 7 percent of sales in March were foreclosures and 1 percent were short sales. On average, foreclosures sold for a discount of 16 percent below market value while short sales were discounted 10 percent.
  4. All-cash sales: All-cash transactions comprised 25 percent of the market in March, up from 24 percent a year ago. Individual investors account for the bulk of cash sales and purchased 14 percent of homes in March, unchanged from a year ago.
  5. Inventory: The number of homes for sale rose 5.9 percent in March to 1.98 million. Still, that remains 1.5 percent lower than a year ago. Unsold inventory is at a 4.5-month supply at the current sales pace.

“The choppiness in sales activity so far this year is directly related to the unevenness in the rate of new listings coming onto the market to replace what is, for the most part, being sold rather quickly,” Yun says. “Additionally, a segment of would-be buyers at the upper end of the market appear to have been spooked by January’s stock market correction.”

Regional Breakdown

Here’s a look at how existing-home sales fared across the country in March:

  • Northeast: Existing-home sales surged 11.1 percent to an annual rate of 700,000, which is 7.7 percent higher than a year ago. Median price: $254,100, up 5.8 percent from a year ago.
  • Midwest: Existing-home sales rose 9.8 percent to an annual rate of 1.23 million, which is 0.8 percent higher than a year ago. Median price: $174,800, up 7 percent from a year ago.
  • South: Existing-home sales increased 2.7 percent to an annual rate of 2.25 million, which is 2.3 percent higher than a year ago. Median price: $194,400, up 4.6 percent from a year ago.
  • West: Existing-home sales increased 1.8 percent to an annual rate of 1.15 million, which is 2.5 percent lower than a year ago. Median price: $320,800, up 5.9 percent from a year ago.

Source: National Association of REALTORS®; REALTOR® Magazine Online, Daily Real Estate News 042016

Kenneth Bargers, REALTOR® | Pilkerton Realtors
(615) 512-9836 cellular (615) 371-2474 office kb@bargers-solutions.com email
www.bargers-solutions.com web kennethbargers.com blog
2 Cadillac Drive, Brentwood Tennessee address

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First-Time Buyers Fuel Latest Sales Boost

First-Time Buyers Fuel Latest Sales Boost
Article by Daily Real Estate News | June 22, 2015

REALTORlogoExisting-home sales rose in May to their highest pace in nearly six years, largely attributed to a big rise in the number of first-time home buyers, according to the National Association of REALTORS®’ latest housing report, released Monday. All major regions saw sales increases in May, with the Northeast seeing the most notable rise.

Existing-home sales – measured as completed transactions of single-family homes, townhomes, condos, and co-ops – climbed 5.1 percent to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.35 million in May. Sales are 9.2 percent above last year at this time.

The market share of first-time home buyers rose to 32 percent of transactions in May, matching the highest share since September 2012. A year ago, first-time buyers represented 27 percent of all buyers, NAR reports.

“The return of first-time buyers in May is an encouraging sign and is the result of multiple factors, including strong job gains among young adults, less expensive mortgage insurance and lenders offering low downpayment programs,” says Lawrence Yun, NAR’s chief economist. “More first-time buyers are expected to enter the market in coming months, but the overall share climbing higher will depend on how fast rates and prices rise.”

As the supply of homes remain tight, homes are selling fast and price growth in many markets continues to teeter at or near double-digit appreciation, Yun notes. “Without solid gains in new home construction, prices will likely stay elevated – even with higher mortgage rates above 4 percent,” Yun says.

5 Stats to Gauge the Market

Here’s an overview on key market conditions from NAR’s latest existing-home sales report:

  1. Inventory: Total housing inventory rose 3.2 percent to 2.29 million existing homes available for sale by the end of May. That is 1.8 percent higher than a year ago. Unsold inventory currently is at a 5.1-month supply at the current sales pace, down from 5.2 months in April.
  2. Home prices: The median existing-home price for all housing types was $228,700 in May – nearly 8 percent above May 2014 home prices.
  3. Days on the market: Properties typically stayed on the market for 40 days in May, up from 39 days in April. Still, that marks the third shortest time since NAR began tracking days on the market in May 2011. Forty-five percent of homes sold in May were on the market for less than a month.
  4. All-cash sales: All-cash sales comprised 24 percent of transactions in May, down considerably from a year ago when they made up 32 percent of transactions. Individual investors, who account for the bulk of cash sales, purchased 14 percent of homes last month, down from 16 percent a year ago. Sixty-seven percent of investors paid cash in May.
  5. Distressed sales: Foreclosures and short sales remained at 10 percent for the third consecutive month in May. Distressed sales are below the 11 percent share a year ago. Seven percent of May sales were foreclosures and 3 percent were short sales. Foreclosures sold for an average discount of 15 percent below market value in May while short sales were also discounted 16 percent.

Regional Breakdown

The following is a snapshot of how existing-home sales fared across the country in May:

  • Northeast: existing-home sales rose 11.3 percent to an annual rate of 690,000. Sales are now 11.3 percent above a year ago. Median price: $269,000, up 4.8 percent above May 2014 levels.
  • Midwest: existing-home sales rose 4.1 percent to an annual rate of 1.27 million in May. Sales are 12.4 percent above May 2014. Median price: $181,900, up 9.4 percent from a year ago.
  • South: existing-home sales increased 4.3 percent to an annual rate of 2.18 million in May, and are 6.9 percent above year ago levels. Median price: $198,300, up 8.2 percent from a year ago.
  • West: existing-home sales increased 4.3 percent to an annual rate of 1.21 million in May, and are 9 percent above a year ago. Median price: $324,000, up 10.2 percent above May 2014.

Source: National Association of REALTORS®; REALTOR® Magazine Online, Daily Real Estate News 062215

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